The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology

Aims & Scope

Get Email Updates


Editor-in-chief: Maryon McDonald, University of Cambridge, UK

The Cambridge Journal of Anthropology is an international, peer-reviewed journal committed to publishing leading scholarship in contemporary anthropology. Geographically diverse articles provide a range of theoretical or ethical perspectives, from the traditional to the mischievous or subversive, and aim to offer new insights into the worlds in which we live. The journal will publish challenging ethnography and push hard at the boundaries of the discipline in addition to examining or incorporating fields—from economics to neuroscience—with which anthropology has long been in dialogue. The original journal of this name was an in-house publication based at Cambridge University, with a remit to provide a space in which innovative material and ideas could be tested. The new Cambridge Journal of Anthropology builds on that tradition and seeks to produce new analytical toolkits for anthropology or to take all such intellectual exploration to task.

Published twice a year, the journal features articles and book reviews in addition to an occasional ‘Reflections and Commentary’ section. Proposals for special issues and review articles are also welcomed.

Subjects: Anthropology


Current Issue

Volume 33 • Issue 2 • Autumn 2015


Do Animists Become Naturalists when Converting to Christianity? Discussing an Ontological Turn
Aparecida Vilaça

SPECIAL SECTION - Intimacy Revisited

Guest Editors: Sertaç Sehlikoglu and Asli Zengin

Introduction: Why Revisit Intimacy?
Sertaç Sehlikoglu and Asli Zengin

Intimacy and Belonging in Cuban Tourism and Migration
Valerio Simoni

Bordering Intimacy: The FIght against Marriages of Convenience in Brussels
Maïté Maskens

Labours of Inter-religious Tolerance: Cultural and Spatial Intimacy in Croatia and Turkey
Jeremy F. Walton

Intimate Publics, Public Intimacies: Natural Limits, Creation and the Culture of Mahremiyet in Turkey
Sertaç Sehlikoglu

Intimate Events: The Correctness of Affective Transactions in Northeast Brazil
Matan Shapiro

Commentary: Intimacy through the Ethnographic Lens
Niko Besnier

An Author Meets His Critics
Anthropology and Moral Philosophy: A Symposium on Michael Banner's The Ethics of Everyday Life

Introduction and Reply
Michael Banner

Lesley A. Sharp, Richard Madsen, John H. Evans, J. Derrick Lemons, Thomas J. Csordas